Candymaker Carrie Abbott on favorite foods, cooking for family and what’s in her fridge

by | People, Q&A

In 2012, Carrie Abbott, then a caterer, tried to create a homemade Butterfinger candy bar for a wedding client, but what emerged became her signature creation – Frittle. This delightful concoction, a nostalgic fusion of peanut brittle and fudge, would become the cornerstone of her confectionery empire. What began as a humble “mistake” quickly evolved into small gifts for friends and then into a burgeoning brand known as Newfangled Confections.

As her Frittle gained popularity, she transitioned from local Indianapolis artisan to nationally recognized candymaker. Her products found their way onto the shelves of major big-box retailers such as Target, Fresh Market, Fresh Thyme and Barnes & Noble, solidifying her place in the consumer packaged goods industry. In 2020, Carrie acquired The Best Chocolate in Town, an Indy-based craft chocolate company, and earlier this year expanded her goodie empire further by acquiring Fudge in a Cup, an Indiana craft fudge company.

What’s your favorite type of food and why? I must give it to Asian food, specifically the noodles and soup families. I will eat that on the hottest day of the year.

Where do you get your inspiration? My inspiration comes from other passionate food people, whether talking to chefs or dining out. I have also been inspired by someone with more experience, even at the ripe age of 49.

What is your favorite thing to make for yourself and or your family? I like making breakfast for the family. We’ve got a couple of things going on at home. We have a keto and a gluten-free, along with two kids still in school. I’ll eat anything, but that’s one meal that fits everybody.

If you could eat anywhere in the world, where would that be, and what would you eat? I was adopted, and as I grow older, I’m stepping into and embracing being Korean born. I had an opportunity to go there about ten years ago. I plan to go again soon and look forward to that eating experience again. They serve banchan, the vegetable side dishes. (Koreans) don’t sit down for only steak and potatoes; this is an entire adventure of different dishes at once.

If you could choose a favorite place in Indiana to visit, where would that be and what would you eat? I know this seems easy, but I would want a Neapolitan-style pizza. I like going to a place I haven’t been before, and I have heard Diavola in Broad Ripple is excellent.

What items are always in your fridge? I can answer this because everything in my fridge is used for baking. We have half and half, butter and eggs. We always have almond milk or iced coffees. We make ethnic condiments and then typically some version of a steak for my husband.

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